This is just a selfie I Instagramed the other day.

My Bike’s Insight To The Dordogne

I’m an Egyptian-blue semi-retired Giant CFR (…Pro) from the late 90s who’s spent many a year locked in a dark garage.

 

You can imagine my delight then when I was airlifted to the sunny South of France a few years ago. My jockey wheels were positively jangling at the prospect of riverside rides at sunset with my new owner in Aquitaine – sharing tarmac with trim Peugeots from the noughties.

 

I’d heard much about the warm climate and smooth-as-a-top-tube tarmac in France from some ex-Tour de Francers.

 

Admittedly I was a bit hurt when my last owner’s wife spitefully gave me away during the divorce – an undignified scenario for a fine specimen like myself. I couldn’t believe my luck though when it transpired I’d be moving to France with my new owner.

 

Unfortunately, he’s a typical fair-weather rider. He often forgets to flip me over before leaving me for months on end, my spokes haven’t been straightened in years and when my handlebar tape came loose last year he used basic Scotch Sellotape to fix it. The shame. I daren’t imagine the state of my derailleurs. I quite often let my air out for literally no reason in protest. In truth, our relationship revolves around him bashing me with the wrong tools until he’s covered in my oil with sore extremities.

 

Nonetheless, I’m very grateful to be here, so I thought I’d give you other bikes a glimpse into my new home in the Dordogne to entice you out here.

 

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The Dordogne is littered with friendly villages like Mauzac (above) where your owner can stop for a refreshing Orangina. Apparently they like it best served in a glass bottle. Go figure.

 

Be prepared to stop quite frequently at defunct barns that in your owners eyes are calling out to be restored. By them.
Be prepared to stop quite frequently at defunct barns that – in your owners eyes – are calling out to be restored, by them.

 

Expect to make that satisfying "Vvvv" noise here as most of the tarmac is intact. Which is just as well, if a potthole so much as looks at me I'm a gone-er.
Expect to make that satisfying “Vvvv” noise here as most of the tarmac is intact. Which is just as well – if a pothole so much as looks at me I’m a gone-er.

 

There are some cracking picnic spots round here overlooking medieval buildings.
There are some cracking picnic spots here for all you gearly beloveds. Most can be found under droopy willow trees by the river overlooking medieval buildings. Ideal for an old romantic like myself.

 

This is just a selfie I Instagramed the other day.
This is just a selfie I Instagramed the other day…

 

Remain cautious when delving down sidelanes. Some roads inexplicably run out of tarmac and we all know what happens if you attempt a route like the one above.
Remain cautious when delving down sidelanes. Some roads inexplicably run out of tarmac here.

 

Owners love a good sandblasted bridge and there's plenty of them round here for them to stick on Instagram.
Owners love a well sandblasted bridge and there’s plenty of them around here.

 

A classic vista in the Dordogne area. My jittery handlebars never bore of such delightful views.
A classic vista along the Dordogne. My jittery handlebars never bore of this.

 

And incase you were wondering, here's where I rest between rides.
And here’s where I rest between rides. By an unfinished painting near a corner that hasn’t been dusted in well over 3 years. Still, musn’t grumble.

 

If you’re keen on seeing the Dordogne with your own carbon eyelets, I’m told that the cyberspace tool ‘Much Better Adventures’ has made it all very easy. You just get your owner to state dates, group size and preferences and then local specialists around here will come back to you guys with tailored offers. Give it a bash for free here.

 

roadbikingholidays

 

Ps. If there are any Peugeot Urbanite 2.0s in the Lalinde area who are in to heavy pedalling reading this out there… ring your bell.

 

Published by

Sam Bruce

Co-founder, Much Better Adventures.