An all-female international crew of six embarks on a double world record attempt in December this year, rowing 3000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean from the Canary Island of La Gomera to Barbados. The women aged between 22 and 45 have been training, preparing and fundraising to be the first ever crew of six, and the fastest ever female crew to make the crossing. To put a scale on this endeavour, more people have been to space and climbed Everest than have rowed an Ocean. The team are not only hoping to achieve two world records, but to also bring light to one of the most horrendous crimes of today, human trafficking.

They will be setting off with the biennial Woodvale Ocean Rowing Race with 17 other crews from solo rowers to pairs and fours. Once they have pushed off from land they will be relying entirely on each other and what is on board their tiny 7 meter boat to reach Barbados; and will have to function efficiently as a team to do this.
They will face high seas, with waves up to 40ft, extreme fatigue, weight loss, not to mention sores and lack of creature comforts. For one crew member, Helen Leigh, these factors only serve to spur her on; I will relish the physical challenge and the gruelling routine; Im actually looking forward to it. I love training, and the simplicity of eating, sleeping, rowing is a dream come true for me. To be out in the wild taking care of ourselves and battling with the elements is a total privilege.
The girls will row in teams of three rotating every 2 hours for the entire journey. To break the record they will be attempting to row across in less than 50 days. In light of this they are taking little in the way of luxury, in an effort to make the crossing light and fast. The row will be completely unsupported however, so all food, tools and spares will be carried on board.
Combined with the massive physical challenge is a desire to raise awareness of the modern day slavery, human trafficking, an issue close to their hearts. They aim to raise funds for the charities ECPAT UK (End child prostitution and trafficking) and A21 campaign that provides safe housing for victims. Debbie Beadle, one of the crew works for ECPAT UK and says, I work first hand with children who are trafficked and exploited in the UK in the most horrific ways. Every day I see the tremendous resilience and strength in these young people and can only hope that I find a part of that strength to help get me through this challenge.
Although training hard separately; the team have joined together several times in the UK for training, preparation and media; which has taken a tremendous amount of coordination given the locations of the crew.
Based in the UK and in London are Debbie Beadle and Julia Immonen. Helen Leigh is from Lancashire. The international crew members consist of Andrea the Skipper from Boulder Colorado, Kate Richardson, the youngest crew member from Northern Ireland, and Katie Pattison-Hart living in Dubai.
A highlight of the Campaign so far was a boat naming ceremony at Westminster by Olympic Gold medallist Sir Matthew Pinsent who has been a great supporter of the team. This was a special occasion as it was Anti Slavery day and the team also handed over a report supporting their joint campaign with ECPAT UK to call on the UK Government to provide a system of guardianship for child victims of trafficking. The following day the team were invited to 10 Downing Street to meet with David Cameron, in a private meeting to tell him about our Row For Freedom. .
The challenge has been made possible through the generous support of Lead Corporate Sponsor Manpowergroup; Gold sponsors Red Button Design, Dubai Duty Free and Lexis Nexis, as well as others. The team are still seeking further sponsorship and in particular charitable donations to ECPAT UK and A21 Campaign.
For further information and to donate/sponsor please go to www.rowforfreedom.com or contact the team on 07752579051.

An all-female international crew of six embarks on a double world record attempt in December this year, rowing 3000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean from the Canary Island of La Gomera to Barbados. The women aged between 22 and 45 have been training, preparing and fundraising to be the first ever crew of six, and the fastest ever female crew to make the crossing. To put a scale on this endeavour, more people have been to space and climbed Everest than have rowed an Ocean. The team are not only hoping to achieve two world records, but to also bring light to one of the most horrendous crimes of today, human trafficking.

They will be setting off with the biennial Woodvale Ocean Rowing Race with 17 other crews from solo rowers to pairs and fours. Once they have pushed off from land they will be relying entirely on each other and what is on board their tiny 7 meter boat to reach Barbados; and will have to function efficiently as a team to do this.

They will face high seas, with waves up to 40ft, extreme fatigue, weight loss, not to mention sores and lack of creature comforts. For one crew member, Helen Leigh, these factors only serve to spur her on; I will relish the physical challenge and the gruelling routine; Im actually looking forward to it. I love training, and the simplicity of eating, sleeping, rowing is a dream come true for me. To be out in the wild taking care of ourselves and battling with the elements is a total privilege.

The girls will row in teams of three rotating every 2 hours for the entire journey. To break the record they will be attempting to row across in less than 50 days. In light of this they are taking little in the way of luxury, in an effort to make the crossing light and fast. The row will be completely unsupported however, so all food, tools and spares will be carried on board.

Combined with the massive physical challenge is a desire to raise awareness of the modern day slavery, human trafficking, an issue close to their hearts. They aim to raise funds for the charities ECPAT UK (End child prostitution and trafficking) and A21 campaign that provides safe housing for victims. Debbie Beadle, one of the crew works for ECPAT UK and says, I work first hand with children who are trafficked and exploited in the UK in the most horrific ways. Every day I see the tremendous resilience and strength in these young people and can only hope that I find a part of that strength to help get me through this challenge.

Although training hard separately; the team have joined together several times in the UK for training, preparation and media; which has taken a tremendous amount of coordination given the locations of the crew.Based in the UK and in London are Debbie Beadle and Julia Immonen. Helen Leigh is from Lancashire. The international crew members consist of Andrea the Skipper from Boulder Colorado, Kate Richardson, the youngest crew member from Northern Ireland, and Katie Pattison-Hart living in Dubai.A highlight of the Campaign so far was a boat naming ceremony at Westminster by Olympic Gold medallist Sir Matthew Pinsent who has been a great supporter of the team. This was a special occasion as it was Anti Slavery day and the team also handed over a report supporting their joint campaign with ECPAT UK to call on the UK Government to provide a system of guardianship for child victims of trafficking. The following day the team were invited to 10 Downing Street to meet with David Cameron, in a private meeting to tell him about our Row For Freedom.

The challenge has been made possible through the generous support of Lead Corporate Sponsor Manpowergroup; Gold sponsors Red Button Design, Dubai Duty Free and Lexis Nexis, as well as others. The team are still seeking further sponsorship and in particular charitable donations to ECPAT UK and A21 Campaign.For further information and to donate/sponsor please go to www.rowforfreedom.com or contact the team on 07752579051.

The team were recently featured on Sky Sports News, the video of which is below…