Fuerteventura a Kayak Surfers Paradise
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Grinding heavy reef breaks, ultra long left hand points or getting pitted at wedging beach breaks its easy to see the attractions of kayak surfing in Fuerteventura.
Bear in mind that this mid Atlantic rock is an island too, and it couldnt be easier for the travelling paddler to get around from setup to setup. This is just what I needed and I didnt waste any time booking my ticket.
Corralejo
Previously a sleepy fishing village now transformed into the main tourist hub on the island, Corralejo has a number of traits that make the town attractive to the wave rider.
A plethora of accommodation options are available with everything from self-catering to the more luxurious. The majority of digs are within walking distance of the main centre of town where you will find plenty of bars and restaurants. Youll be spoilt for choice for your evening down time away from the surf.
I chose a small self-catering apartment that was just a short stroll from the centre of town. It was basic, but ticked all the boxes I needed. Bed, bathroom, kitchen and a small amount of storage – perfect for the visiting wave head.
With waves in mind you couldnt be in a better spot. Right out front of the large Atlantico Shopping Centre is the main harbour with good waves to both the north and south.
Shooting Gallery is the more advanced spot, with Rocky Point being a slightly mellower affair although dont be fooled, the waves in Fuerte all pack a punch. Walking to these breaks from my accommodation took about ten minutes and, with a kayak trolley, lugging my gear was pretty easy.
Continuing on south you will find the famous set ups of Flag Beach and Glass Beach. Each are left hand point breaks that require hefty swells to break, although with a bit of breeze a moderate wind swell sometimes rolls onto the reef. It took me slightly longer to walk here and the tiring journey back after being pummelled by Atlantic waves was not welcome!
That said, the fact I could access all these spots on foot highlights how easy it is to get around this part of the island. And the stroll to and from venues was a nice warm up and warm down after my session.
If you become weary of getting battered by waves then the harbour in Corralejo will offer some flat water respite.
The northern track
Head across the opposite side of the island to Cotillo and you will discover a moderately-heavy beach break that dishes up fun shore dump type waves with lips that just beg to ridden.
Cotillo is also the gateway to the fabled northern track, which is notorious for both the potholed nature of the so-called road and the world class wave setups you will find.
Being mostly hard-core reef spots, youll need your wits about you and a high level of skill if youre going to attempt to conquer any of these waves be under no illusion, these breaks are heavy, powerful and demand respect!
I tried out a couple of gentler breaks in my kayak, which were still quite powerful. It took a while to dial in to the speed and hollowness of each wave but after a short time my confidence increased and I had a whale of a time.
As the swell picked up I decided to grab my surfboard, which is easier to manoeuvre, get out of trouble and handles beefier conditions. There was also no one else around and I was conscious of not getting into a spot of bother with no one to raise the alarm to.
Exploring the island
After a few days I decided to go exploring, knowing from previous visits that good waves are all over the island though the time of year you visit will ultimately dictate the quality of these.
Winter is when booming swells pummel Fuerte meaning that those quiet, tucked away waves usually spring to life, whereas summer sees smaller swells and windier conditions meaning shelter can be difficult to find.
If youre faced with this then you could consider some downwind paddling to get your water-based fix.
As Fuerte receives steady Trade Winds, this could be your saving grace during windy spells. Head off downwind using the breeze to help propel you and, with such an interesting coastline to explore, who knows what you may discover.
Whichever time of year you choose to travel to Fuerteventura, you will find some form of swell. You may have drive to find waves but youll score something. If you want guaranteed pumping conditions the winter is your best bet just be prepared for some solid conditions!
I managed to score something more or less every day. Head to Fuerteventura with an open mind and a pinch of optimism and you should be rewarded.
Tez Plavenieks is a well-travelled watersports fanatic and keen stand up paddle boarder. Youll often find him hitting the waves on the UK South Coast or anywhere else around the world. Tez writes for Sitons; a UK-based sit on top kayaking community site.

Grinding heavy reef breaks, ultra long left hand points or getting pitted at wedging beach breaks its easy to see the attractions of kayak surfing in Fuerteventura.

Bear in mind that this mid Atlantic rock is an island too, and it couldnt be easier for the travelling paddler to get around from setup to setup. This is just what I needed and I didnt waste any time booking my ticket.

Corralejo

Previously a sleepy fishing village now transformed into the main tourist hub on the island, Corralejo has a number of traits that make the town attractive to the wave rider.

A plethora of accommodation options are available with everything from self-catering to the more luxurious. The majority of digs are within walking distance of the main centre of town where you will find plenty of bars and restaurants.

Youll be spoilt for choice for your evening down time away from the surf. I chose a small self-catering apartment that was just a short stroll from the centre of town. It was basic, but ticked all the boxes I needed.

Bed, bathroom, kitchen and a small amount of storage – perfect for the visiting wave head.With waves in mind you couldnt be in a better spot. Right out front of the large Atlantico Shopping Centre is the main harbour with good waves to both the north and south.

Shooting Gallery is the more advanced spot, with Rocky Point being a slightly mellower affair although dont be fooled, the waves in Fuerte all pack a punch.

Walking to these breaks from my accommodation took about ten minutes and, with a kayak trolley, lugging my gear was pretty easy.

Continuing on south you will find the famous set ups of Flag Beach and Glass Beach. Each are left hand point breaks that require hefty swells to break, although with a bit of breeze a moderate wind swell sometimes rolls onto the reef.

It took me slightly longer to walk here and the tiring journey back after being pummelled by Atlantic waves was not welcome!

That said, the fact I could access all these spots on foot highlights how easy it is to get around this part of the island. And the stroll to and from venues was a nice warm up and warm down after my session.

If you become weary of getting battered by waves then the harbour in Corralejo will offer some flat water respite.

The northern track

Head across the opposite side of the island to Cotillo and you will discover a moderately-heavy beach break that dishes up fun shore dump type waves with lips that just beg to ridden.

Cotillo is also the gateway to the fabled northern track, which is notorious for both the potholed nature of the so-called road and the world class wave setups you will find.

Being mostly hard-core reef spots, youll need your wits about you and a high level of skill if youre going to attempt to conquer any of these waves be under no illusion, these breaks are heavy, powerful and demand respect!

I tried out a couple of gentler breaks in my kayak, which were still quite powerful. It took a while to dial in to the speed and hollowness of each wave but after a short time my confidence increased and I had a whale of a time.

As the swell picked up I decided to grab my surfboard, which is easier to manoeuvre, get out of trouble and handles beefier conditions. There was also no one else around and I was conscious of not getting into a spot of bother with no one to raise the alarm to.

Exploring the island

After a few days I decided to go exploring, knowing from previous visits that good waves are all over the island though the time of year you visit will ultimately dictate the quality of these.

Winter is when booming swells pummel Fuerte meaning that those quiet, tucked away waves usually spring to life, whereas summer sees smaller swells and windier conditions meaning shelter can be difficult to find.

If youre faced with this then you could consider some downwind paddling to get your water-based fix.

As Fuerte receives steady Trade Winds, this could be your saving grace during windy spells. Head off downwind using the breeze to help propel you and, with such an interesting coastline to explore, who knows what you may discover.

Whichever time of year you choose to travel to Fuerteventura, you will find some form of swell. You may have drive to find waves but youll score something. If you want guaranteed pumping conditions the winter is your best bet just be prepared for some solid conditions!

I managed to score something more or less every day. Head to Fuerteventura with an open mind and a pinch of optimism and you should be rewarded.

Tez Plavenieks is a well-travelled watersports fanatic and keen stand up paddle boarder. Youll often find him hitting the waves on the UK South Coast or anywhere else around the world. Tez writes for Sitons; a UK-based sit on top kayaking community site.

Inspired? Take a look at our Canoe and Kayak holidaysand browse all our kayak holidays in Spain.