With Summer 2012 just ahead, its about time to start planning your next holidays. And if youre looking for a chance to explore Her Majestys lands, why not head down south to the Jurassic Coast? In case youre wondering what the deal is, heres a clue: its nothing to do with dinosaurs!
Since 2001, the “Jurassic Coast” is the official designation of a stretch of coast facing the English Channel. Spanning nearly 100 miles (from East Devon to East Dorset), it’s one of the few designated World Heritage Sites in the UK. Whether you’re a British or a foreigner, it’s worth taking your time to traverse this scenic route; this article will highlight the most interesting towns you’ll come across.
Exmouth
Photo Credit – http://www.flickr.com/photos/saras2uk/4487689829/
This is widely regarded as the Western end of the Jurassic coast, and its a great place to start this adventure! Exmouth is a port town and seaside resort located on the eastern bank of river Exes mouth, featuring plenty of access routes and transportation networks; which means you shouldnt have trouble getting there no matter from where you come.
Once youre here, you might as well take some time to explore the town. There are plenty of historical monuments and landmarks worth checking out. Ask the locals for the A La Ronde and The Barn, if you feel like exploring your surroundings. When youre ready to begin your journey, its 18 miles until the next stop in this itinerary.
Beer, Devon
Photo Credit – http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/628932
What better place to pursue a Summer adventure than a place called Beer? Granted, the name of this village is not derived from the beverage but rather from an ancient term referring to the dense forestation in this area. Still, if youd like to explore what used to be a smugglers cave, this is a great place to visit!
One of the main touristic attractions in this village is a huge complex of man-made tunnels called the Beer Quarry Caves. This site (located on the outskirts of Beer) has long served as the main national source of Beer stone, a special type of limestone that has been used to build many monuments over the years, as well as for sculpting purposes.
Charmouth
Photo credit – http://www.flickr.com/photos/30302870@N08/3106053278/sizes/z/in/photostream/
Just 11 miles to the west of Beer, youll come across another charming village worth visiting: Charmouth. This peaceful village was built around the mouth of River Char, and it’s notable for its quiet and whimsical sceneries, which are known to have inspired the likes of Jane Austen.
There are some lovely beaches in the area, and in the cliffs above some of those beaches theres a rather unique highlight: abundant remnants from the Jurassic period, which are constantly scoured by geologists and fossil enthusiasts (be wary while exploring those rocks though, as they are often slippery and subject to flooding tides).
Isle of Portland
Photo credit – http://www.flickr.com/photos/marilynjane/401006732/sizes/z/in/photostream/
Another 29 miles westbound off Charmouth, and youll get to the next stop in this journey of Jurassic Coast exploration: the Isle of Portland. This cheerful island is actually land-tied, meaning you can walk to it from the coast, through a tiny deposition landform called a tombolo.
There are many interesting things to see in the Isle of Portland, especially if youre interested in architecture. But one of the most striking attractions here is the Portland Harbour, which remains to date one of the largest harbours ever built by man.
Swanage
Photo credit – http://www.flickr.com/photos/herry/2640685250/sizes/z/in/photostream/
33 miles further to the west along the Jurassic Coast, and you’ll get to Swanage – once a small fishing village, now an attractive tourist resort. This is a great place to relax and bask in the sun, but there are also plenty of interesting monuments and buildings left over from the Victorian era, during which time Swanage was a highly sought after seaside holiday destination for the affluent.
Presently, there are also plenty of festivals and events taking place around the year – the highlight being the week-long carnival celebrations, which includes plenty of masquerades, balls and parades. This colorful celebration encompasses the week before lent, and its well worth checking out.
This guest post was brought to you by UkHolidayPlaces.co.uk, a leading source for holiday accommodation across the UK.

With Summer 2012 just ahead, its about time to start planning your next holidays. And if youre looking for a chance to explore Her Majestys lands, why not head down south to the Jurassic Coast? In case youre wondering what the deal is, heres a clue: its nothing to do with dinosaurs!

Since 2001, the “Jurassic Coast” is the official designation of a stretch of coast facing the English Channel. Spanning nearly 100 miles (from East Devon to East Dorset), it’s one of the few designated World Heritage Sites in the UK. Whether you’re a British or a foreigner, it’s worth taking your time to traverse this scenic route; this article will highlight the most interesting towns you’ll come across.

Exmouth

This is widely regarded as the Western end of the Jurassic coast, and its a great place to start this adventure! Exmouth is a port town and seaside resort located on the eastern bank of river Exes mouth, featuring plenty of access routes and transportation networks; which means you shouldnt have trouble getting there no matter from where you come.

Once youre here, you might as well take some time to explore the town. There are plenty of historical monuments and landmarks worth checking out. Ask the locals for the A La Ronde and The Barn, if you feel like exploring your surroundings. When youre ready to begin your journey, its 18 miles until the next stop in this itinerary.

Beer, Devon

What better place to pursue a Summer adventure than a place called Beer? Granted, the name of this village is not derived from the beverage but rather from an ancient term referring to the dense forestation in this area. Still, if youd like to explore what used to be a smugglers cave, this is a great place to visit!

One of the main touristic attractions in this village is a huge complex of man-made tunnels called the Beer Quarry Caves. This site (located on the outskirts of Beer) has long served as the main national source of Beer stone, a special type of limestone that has been used to build many monuments over the years, as well as for sculpting purposes.

Charmouth

Just 11 miles to the west of Beer, youll come across another charming village worth visiting: Charmouth. This peaceful village was built around the mouth of River Char, and it’s notable for its quiet and whimsical sceneries, which are known to have inspired the likes of Jane Austen.

There are some lovely beaches in the area, and in the cliffs above some of those beaches theres a rather unique highlight: abundant remnants from the Jurassic period, which are constantly scoured by geologists and fossil enthusiasts (be wary while exploring those rocks though, as they are often slippery and subject to flooding tides).

Isle of Portland

Another 29 miles westbound off Charmouth, and youll get to the next stop in this journey of Jurassic Coast exploration: the Isle of Portland. This cheerful island is actually land-tied, meaning you can walk to it from the coast, through a tiny deposition landform called a tombolo.

There are many interesting things to see in the Isle of Portland, especially if youre interested in architecture. But one of the most striking attractions here is the Portland Harbour, which remains to date one of the largest harbours ever built by man.

Swanage

33 miles further to the west along the Jurassic Coast, and you’ll get to Swanage – once a small fishing village, now an attractive tourist resort. This is a great place to relax and bask in the sun, but there are also plenty of interesting monuments and buildings left over from the Victorian era, during which time Swanage was a highly sought after seaside holiday destination for the affluent.

Presently, there are also plenty of festivals and events taking place around the year – the highlight being the week-long carnival celebrations, which includes plenty of masquerades, balls and parades. This colorful celebration encompasses the week before lent, and its well worth checking out.

Click here to see a range of great walking holidays!

This guest post was brought to you by UkHolidayPlaces.co.uk, a leading source for holiday accommodation across the UK.